Posts Tagged ‘Christianity’

Last Friday, Jerry Falwell, Jr. took to Fox News to proclaim that in Donald Trump, “evangelicals have found their dream president.” Two years ago, this statement would have made virtually no sense, at least on the surface. To many outside the white evangelical world, it seemed — and still seems — inconceivable that a thrice-married serial adulterer, ultimate materialist, casino owner, habitual liar, and unprincipled deal-maker could ever become the standard bearer for a group that professes to base their vote on “family values.”

How times have changed. In the two years since Trump announced his candidacy, we have seen a remarkable moral unmasking of white Americans who call themselves Christian, and in particular those who claim the “evangelical” label. Eighty-one percent of white evangelical voters cast their vote for Donald Trump, and the most recent Pew Research poll puts Trump’s support after his first 100 days in office at 78 percent among white evangelicals (and 80 percent among white evangelicals who attend church once a month).

So it makes sense that Falwell would be asked to rate the president on his first 100 days from an evangelical perspective: Falwell was essentially a surrogate for Trump during much of the campaign. And in late January, Trump asked Falwell to lead a taskforce on higher education policy, whose aim is to recommend changes that should be made to Department of Education policies and procedures. He has indicated in particular that he wants to curb or eliminate federal rules that he views as overly burdensome, including the requirement that schools must investigate campus sexual assault under Title IX, a federal law banning discrimination in education.

Given Falwell’s close relationship with Trump’s campaign and administration, it’s unsurprising that he spoke so glowingly about what he views as the Trump administration’s accomplishments so far. Here are some of the claims Falwell made for why Trump is a “dream president” for evangelicals:

  • Trump is more pro-Israel than Obama.
  • He appointed Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court.
  • He has appointed people of faith to his Cabinet.
  • Trump will destroy ISIS, thereby saving the lives of many persecuted Christians in the region.
  • Trump supports secure borders (e.g. the wall).
  • Trump is bringing jobs back to America.
  • Trump is cracking down on “sanctuary cities.”

Falwell made a point to note that he felt “… evangelicals didn’t just vote on social issues this time, because the Republican establishment had lied to them over decades about those issues, and so instead, they went a different direction,” which was his explanation for why so many white evangelicals are “thrilled” about Trump’s hardline positions on immigration. In supporting Trump’s crackdowns and, in Trump’s words, “big” and “beautiful” wall that will keep immigrants out, Falwell is explicitly and proudly saying that white evangelicals voted for Trump not in spite of his racist and xenophobic rhetoric about undocumented immigrants, but because of this rhetoric. How that relates to Christians, including evangelicals, who are in direct relationship to the undocumented immigrants and refugees that Trump wants to deport or keep out of our country, Falwell didn’t say.

Falwell also didn’t mention that Trump’s agenda and proposed budget would brutally cut off vital support to all “the least of these” that Jesus asks us to protect in the 25th chapter of Matthew’s gospel — or that a broad cross-section of leaders from all our Christian families, including the National Association of Evangelicals, have pleaded with this administration and Congress not to do so.

As in this latest interview, Jerry Falwell, Jr. has once again shown himself to be nothing more or less than a Republican political operative, interested in advancing his preferred policy agenda much more than examining what it means to be a Christian. Famously, when the Access Hollywood tape came out with Trump bragging his ability to commit sexual assault with impunity, Falwell stood by Trump, suggesting a “conspiracy” of GOP establishment leaders was to blame for the leak. Falwell also said that “we’re never going to have a perfect candidate unless Jesus Christ is on the ballot” and defended Trump as “a changed man,” saying, “We’re not electing a pastor. We’re electing a president.”

You can imagine how jarring it was and is to see the same religious right figures who (rightly) condemned Bill Clinton’s infidelity come to Trump’s defense. A startling poll in October 2016 showed the dramatic change in white evangelical attitudes: In 2011, only 30 percent of white evangelicals agreed with the idea that “an elected official can behave ethically even if they have committed immoral acts in their personal life.” By October 2016, that figure had jumped to 72 percent. This was the largest recorded change on the answer to this question of any racial, religious, or political demographic measured by this poll.

The issue here is not Christians voting differently from each other. That is normal and likely healthy given the independence that people of faith should show over partisan loyalties. This is about the moral hypocrisy of white American evangelical religious right leaders like Jerry Falwell, Jr. causing a crisis in the church, dividing American Christians on racial lines, and astonishing the worldwide body of Christ — the international majority of evangelical Christians who are people of color — and whose leaders keep asking many of us what in the world is going on with white American evangelicals.

That number, 81 percent, has become an international symbol that tragically now represents what white American evangelicalism stands for. It dramatically and painfully symbolizes the white ethno-nationalism that Donald Trump appeals to and continues to draw support from among white American evangelicals. It is the most revealing and hurtful metric of what I will call the racial idolatry of white American evangelical Christianity, which clearly excludes American evangelicals of color and the global majority of evangelicals. The 81 percent number ultimately signifies a betrayal of the body of Christ — which is the most racially inclusive and diverse community in the world today.

Jerry Falwell, Jr. and I believe in different gospels. With Falwell, of course, this is also a like father like son history. Jerry Falwell, Sr. opposed the civil rights movement and the black churches who led it. On the Supreme Court decision in Brown vs. Board of Education that integrated public schools, Falwell, Sr. preached:

“If Chief Justice Warren and his associates had known God’s word and had desired to do the Lord’s will, I am quite confident that the 1954 decision would never have been made … The facilities should be separate. When God has drawn a line of distinction, we should not attempt to cross that line … The true Negro does not want integration …. He realizes his potential is far better among his own race … [integration] will destroy our race eventually. In one northern city, a pastor friend of mine tells me that a couple of opposite race live next door to his church as man and wife.”

In fact, he founded the Liberty Christian Academy in 1967, which the Lynchburg News at the time described as “a private school for white students.”

He also attacked Martin Luther King, Jr., saying:

“I must personally say that I do question the sincerity and nonviolent intentions of some civil rights leaders such as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Mr. James Farmer, and others, who are known to have left-wing associations … It is very obvious that the Communists, as they do in all parts of the world, are taking advantage of a tense situation in our land, and are exploiting every incident to bring about violence and bloodshed.”

As late as the 1980s, Falwell, Sr. personally attacked South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu by calling him a “phony” and campaigned against sanctioning the Apartheid regime in South Africa. Falwell, Sr. later distanced himself from these views, but they remain an important element explaining the origin of the religious right and the views of too many white evangelicals today.

Racism is not a gospel issue to the Falwells, and never has been. That Donald Trump began his political career with a racist lie about America’s first black president isn’t an issue for Falwell, Jr. That Trump opened his campaign by demonizing immigrants in calling them “rapists” and “criminal” doesn’t matter to Jr. either. And Trump’s xenophobic assaults on Muslims seems to be something that Falwell. also agrees with, as his comments at the Liberty University convocation in 2015 indicate. After the San Bernardino shootings, he told his audience that he had a gun in his back pocket ready to use against “those Muslims:” “I’ve always thought that if more good people had concealed-carry permits, then we could end those Muslims before they walked in … let’s teach them a lesson if they ever show up here.”

It is important to remember that the majority of American evangelicals of color, and the 19 percent of us white evangelicals who voted with them — against Trump — did so because we are pro-life and pro-family. For all of us, Trump’s racial bigotry was a deal breaker and disqualifier of a Christian vote. That only a few conservative evangelical leaders, like Southern Baptist Russell Moore, took that stance was one of the saddest things about the 2016 election.

Racism and racial bigotry is a gospel issue, and overcoming our human divisions in a new multi-cultural community was at the center of the vocation of the early church. Last week, when I debated Eric Metaxas, an ally of Jerry Falwell, Jr., he said that raising the issue of race is not Christian — that talking about racism was racist. No. Unlike Dietrich Bonhoeffer, whom he has written about, Metaxas — like Falwell — has gotten the gospel wrong. It’s time for other white evangelicals to call out the white American evangelical leaders who have yet to speak out against the racial politics of President Donald Trump in his campaign, in his first 100 days, and going forward. The integrity of the church is at stake, as is our relationship with our brothers and sisters of color in United States, and our loyalty to the global multi-color majority of the body of Christ.

Let’s go back to Falwell’s characterization of Trump as a “dream president” for evangelicals. He can only mean white evangelicals. I can testify to a legion of conversations with African-American, Hispanic, and Asian-American evangelicals who would describe Donald Trump as a “nightmare” president. Ditto for almost all black parents and black pastors. Certainly Trump is a nightmare for Hispanic people in America, who are living under fear of their families being destroyed by the new president’s aggressive deportation policies.

That Trump is the dream president for people like Falwell and such a nightmare for the vast majority of evangelical, Pentecostal, and Catholic Christians around the world, and our brothers and sisters of color in the United States, really says it all.

This stark contrast reveals white evangelical Christianity in America as a bubble — a very destructive one, and one that is about to burst.

By Jim Wallis

Posted by The NON-Conformist

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This piece is thoughtful, I’m posting so that you see differing opinions. The one thing I will say, you can’t take the bible at face value until you study the “history.” 

The earliest gods and messiahs on all the continents were black. Research has yielded an impressive amount of material on the subject…The Messiahs, some of whom lived many centuries before Christ, had lives which so closely paralleled that of Christ that it seems most likely that the story of the latter was adapted from them. Moreover, the word Christ comes from the Indian, Krishna or Chrisna, which means “The Black One.”

J.A. Rogers

Many of the madonnas painted in the earliest centuries of Christ- iandom were black, according to historians, and it wasn’t until the Renaissance that it became popular to give the mother of Christ the features of a Florentine maiden [a white woman]

Washington Post (Religion) May 4, 1979.

Here in the United States, well over 95% of the 27 to 30 million people of African descent are Christians and they joined most of the rest of the Christian world in observing the birth of Jesus on December 25, Christmas Day. No other historical figure has received the recognition, veneration and unquestioned loyalty of Black people in the Western world that Jesus has. Yet, despite their widespread respect for and worship of Jesus, few Black people in the Americas or elsewhere ever have raised the question of whether He was Black and whether the doctrine He espoused was of African origin. Trained by white theologians or taught in White owned, controlled or financed seminaries, the average Black minister will not only deny that Jesus was a black man and claim that it is sinful to raise the question of His color, but also will insist that Jesus was colorless and declare that the blue- eyed blond painting of him hovering over the minister’s pulpit is just a White reflection of Christ’s universality. It is quite understandable, then, that the masses of Black Christians, who generaLly hold their ministers in high esteem, blithely continue to bow before, pray to and worship a blue-eyed blond stranger whom they have come to know as Jesus without ever questioning this image and its impact on them, their families and the Black race as a whole.

Recognizing the historical significance of religion to Black people and observing its present role in their nations and communities the world over, this writer feels that it is high time that the deeply-rooted religious beliefs of Blacks be fully examined by Black scholars with an eye toward freeing the race of false doctrines and misconceptions that were designed to perpetuate Black inferiority and servility. Since religion plays a key role in molding Black opinion and guiding Black behavior in Africa and the diaspora, the specific intent of this article on religion, is to reveal what modern science is proving each day – that the roots of all major religions are traceable to the Black people of ancient Africa and that most of the world’s venerated religious leaders were Blacks. It is hoped that these revelations will instill a sense of pride in Black people, hasten the day when false images will be removed from their houses of worship and free them of the widespread assumption – which is deeply embedded in their individual and collective subconscious – that they are cursed and doomed to failure because they were not created in God’s image.

Professor Locksley D.M. Geoghagen is one of the few black authorities on the origin of the Christian religion. A scholar of African-Jamaican ancestry, he has served as the Associate Director of the Educational Opportunities Program and a teacher in the Education Department at Cal Poly College, San Luis Obispo, California. He is a learning specialist with expertise in brain physiology, especially the cerebral hemisphere, and has teaching credentials on the community college level in psychology, education, political science, counseling and pupil personnel. Professor Geoghagen is also the coordinator of Leadership Programs at Cal Poly College.

A rare pluridisciplinary scholar, Professor Geoghagen has lectured broadly on subjects that range from melanin and the pineal gland to the African roots of civilization. He has often lectured with the distinguished author and scholar, Dr. Donald Cheek, and has traveled extensively, especially in Africa, with the world renowned historian, Dr. Yosef ben-Jochannan.

Professor Geoghagen has completed the course requirements for the Ph.D. in education at the University of California at Santa Barbara, and he plans to soon enter the field of Egyptology as an understudy of Dr. ben-Jochannan, Professor Geoghagen’s expertise on early Christianity has been acquired over the past ten years, during which time he has engaged in research, lecturing and writing in the United Sates, the Caribbean and Africa.

The following is an interview with Professor Geoghagen on religion in general and the ancestry of Jesus in particular.

MAAT: Professor Geoghagen, why don’t I just start with the question before us: Was Jesus a Black man?

Geoghagen: Yes, unequivocally and beyond a shadow of doubt, Jesus was a black man and there is much evidence to substantiate this. However, before I discuss this evidence, I would like to consider in some detail who Jesus was and to focus on the history of Christianity because Jesus’ blackness will not be fully understood or accepted without this background.

MAAT: Okay, just who was Jesus?

Geoghagen: That is a very difficult question to answer, for Jesus was and still is many things to many people. To Christians he is a part of the Godhead, the Son of God, the Son of Man, the Prince of Peace, the Word made flesh, the messiah of Jewish expectations. Hence, through his trials, sufferings, temptations, death and resurrection, He provides for the remission of sins, redemption and life eternal for those who follow his teachings and accept him as their personal savior. To me, he is one of the world’s 16 crucified saviors — the last of them, I might add – whose lives fit an almost identical pattern from the time of Horus in 4100 B.C. (according to the most ancient beliefs, he was the first crucified savior) to the time of Judas Christas (Christ the anointed) in the pre-Christian era. In essence, the life that Jesus purportedly led, the activities in which he engaged, his teachings, his trials and sufferings and eventual death and resurrection, are identical to those of Horus and Osiris (two ancient Egyptian gods) and the other 14 crucified saviors. This point of view or revelation, though potentially shocking to the mass of believers, is nevertheless common knowledge to scholars. So Jesus and the belief system that he represents are thus a reappearance of one of the most beautiful ideas of the ancient black Africans of Ta-Merry – now called Egypt – which represented the eternal Father by the ever- coming Son, as in the Child Horus. This was the child of a mother who was the eternal virgin. The doctrines of the Incarnation, i.e., the word made flesh: the virgin birth, the resurrection, the Father-God who is identical to his own son and other doctrines (believed to be specifically Christian) were Egyptian long before there was even the concept of Adam and Eve, Judaism, Christianity and Islam.

MAAT: Are you saying that Christianity as a religion had its origins in ancient Egypt?

Geoghagen: Yes. In addition to what I have just stated, in the Eschatology of the Egyptians is found a trinity and a unity, and the Egyptians believed in punishment as well as everlasting happiness. Not surprisingly, then, the doctrine of everlasting life and the belief in the resurrection of the “Spiritual Body” are, according to Dr. Albert Churchward(author of Signs and Symbols of Primordial Man, Origins of Freemasonry, The Origin And Evolution of Religion, The Origin And Evolution of The Human Race, etc.) “the brightest and most prominent features of the Egyptian religion, and this we find was their belief before the time of the first king of the first dynasty.” The general teachings and cosmological world view of the Egyptians eventually filtered down and provided the foundation for later so-called ‘Western Religions,’ i.e., Judaism, Christianity and Islam. This point is thoroughly documented by the brilliant and prolific African scholar, Dr. Josef ben-Jochannan, in an epic work, African Origins of the Major Western Religions. These teachings were handed down to the Essenes (a mythical Jewish sect in pre-Christian times) who were responsible for the development of many of the teachings and concepts attributed to Jesus.

MAAT: Are you suggesting, then, that Jesus was an Essene?

Geoghagan: There is no doubt in my mind that Jesus was an Essene. Essene doctrine is directly traceable to its African-Egyptian roots. In short, Jesus was one of the world’s 16 crucified saviors whose beliefs and teachings were founded on the doctrines and principles of the ancient African Mystery System, and the events of his life directly parallel those of Horus (the first crucified savior), who lived at least 4100 years before Christ. For example, Horus was born of a virgin (immaculate conception), he disappeared at age 12 and reappeared at 30; he died at age 33 and descended into Hell. On the third day, he arose again and ascended into Heaven to sit on the right hand of his father, etc. Horus was cut into 14 pieces; Jesus was stabbed fourteen times. Horus’ mother could find only one piece of him, his penis, and so she built obelisks in his memory. Jesus had the same phallic symbol associated with him, i.e., he had no sexual relations (at least after the conference of Nicene in 325 A.D.). So as you can see, Jesus and the other world saviors are copies of Horus. Their biographical facts are the same; only the names have changed.

MAAT: Are there parts of Jesus’ life that are generally unknown to the public?

GEOGHAGEN: Yes, much if not most of the facts surrounding his life are absolutely unknown to the general public. To be specific, there is a twenty-one year period of his life that is completely unaccounted for in the Gospel. These 21 years, I would argue, are of critical importance in understanding who Jesus was as well as the source, inspiration and eventual development of his message and ministry. The fact is that not only Jesus but also John the Baptizer and some of Jesus’disciples were taught, by Egyptian priests, some of the fundamentals of the African Mystery System which later, through adaptations and distortions, became the foundation for what is now known as Christianity in its various forms and manifestations. The fact that Jesus was an initiate in the African Mystery System; that Jesus was taught and did study at various subsidiary lodges of the Grand Lodge of Luxor in Africa and elsewhere (i.e. Tibet, India, etc.) The fact that it was in Africa that Jesus became acquainted with the Essenes, who were largely responsible for much of the teachings credited to Jesus.

MAAT: You keep mentioning the ancient African Mystery System.Can you briefly tell us what this was?

Geoghagen: Basically, the African Mystery System was the educational system of Africa. It was called a ‘mystery’ by E. Budge, the Famous Egyptologist, and other Egyptian scholars; but it was not a mystery to Africans. It encompassed many branches of knowledge, including all of the sciences, philosophy, physics, all of the liberal arts and, of course, religion and metaphysics.

The foundation of that which was later called Greek philosophy comes directly from the African Mystery System. If an individual wants confirmation of this, he can consult such books as G.M. James’ Stolen Legacy, B.D. Alexander’s History of Philosophy, Alfred Weber’s History of Philosophy, William Turner’s History of Philosophy and Zeber’s History of Philosophy.

Included as a part of the ancient African Mystery System were the major beliefs contained in the so-called ‘Western Religions’ of Judaism, Christianity and Islam. For those who want a closer look at this, I would recommend the Egyptian Book of the Dead and The Ancient Mysteries by C.H. Vail. Another book which provides great detail is Albert Churchward’s Signs and Symbols of Primordial Man. It lays out all of the Hebrew, Christian and Hindu doctrines that come directly from the African Mystery System. A comparable book, also written by Churchward, is Origin And Evolution of Religion.

MAAT: Speaking of references, do you have any sources that support your shocking revelations concerning the life of Jesus?

Geoghagen: I most assuredly do. The details of Jesus’ life from ages 12 to 33 are documented in the Aquarian Gospel of Jesus The Christ by Levi. It gives an account of Jesus’ interaction with his African masters and the teachings which they bestowed on him. Further, it documents the travels of Jesus from Africa to India and his eventual return to Africa; and confirms how Jesus acquired his cosmological world view in the process. The World’s Sixteen Crucified Saviors by Kersey Graves documents much of what I’ve said thus far. Stolen Legacy by George G.M. James, The Kione Bible (the original new testament written between ca. 50 A.D. – 100 A.D.). Anacalypsis by Godfrey Higgins, The Black Messiah by Albert Cleage Jr., and Jesus and The Zealots by S.G.F. Brandon, The Apocryphal New Testament by M.R. James, Rahids’ Aquarian Gospel (another portion of the books removed from the Bible). The Secret Books of the Egyptian Gnostics by J. Doresee. There are literally hundreds of references to back up what I have said, including the work of Gerald Massey, E.A. Wallis Budge, Joel A. Rogers, Albert Churchward and, of course, the works of Yosef ben- Jochannan. These references that I have given will allow interested scholars and individuals to begin to scratch the surface of the wealth of material that is available on this subject.

MAAT: You keep mentioning the Essenes and the fact that Jesus was somehow connected with them. Who are the Essenes and have there been Any scientific or archaeological discoveries that document their existence?

Geoghagen: A large portion of ‘Western Culture’ is indebted to a little known secret cult (a direct offshoot of the African- Egyptian Mystery System) which was called Essene, among other names. This cult of Hebraic people has been identified by their occupation, geographical location, forms of worship and peculiarities of faith. They have been variously known as The Baptizers, The Third Sect, Men of Essa, The Mystery Sect, The Seers, The Pious, The Associates, The Apron Makers, The Propheciers, Seekers Of The Prince of Righteousness, The Essenes and The Ossenes. Ancient documents indicate some of the earliest Essene origins. Pliny the Elder (70-77 A.D.) called them the Hessenes. Josephus (6-8 A.D.) labeled them the Essenes. The same term was later used by Chrysostam, Eusebius, Porphery, Hippolytus, and many other ecclesias and chroniclers. Many of the descriptions given by these writers, particularly Eusebius and Pliny, depict the Essenes as an ‘awesome, ascetic, pietistic sect which might be viewed as the forerunner of today’s ‘mod’ communities.’ This quotation is from Jesus Christ Super Psychic by T.N. Tiemeyer. Anyway, these and many other ancient references to the Essenes were fragmentary, distorted and often inaccurate. For example, ancient writers reported that the Essenes “lived without women, having renounced all sexual love.”

Yet recent diggings in their ancient cemetery have so far unearthed a number of female skeletons. Greek and Roman historians also failed to discern the religious and mystical element which were basic to Essene thought.

MAAT: But what is their relationship to Jesus and what evidence do you have to support it?

Geoghagen: Like you, my primary concern with the Essenes is the relationship of their Order of Sect, and how, through their guidance and direction, Jesus was able to develop his own spiritual talents. For countless centuries, scholars have suggested that many of the teachings attributed to Jesus were very much influenced by the teachings of the Essenes. No doubt the expression of such a viewpoint subjects one to declarations of heresy by those in orthodox church circles. In other words, to even suggest that any part of the message of Jesus is or was less than original with Jesus is, no doubt, heresy. But, heresy or not, the historical facts speak for themselves. The discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls by a young Bedouin, Mohammad el-Deeb, in 1945, did much to shed some light on this controversial topic. These scrolls were discovered in the northwest part of the Dead Sea Valley near Jericho in a series of caves on the edge of a valley named Wali Qumran. In the entire twentieth century, no discovery has had a greater impact on Biblicists, theologians and Judea-Christian exponents than the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls. Most scholars greeted the news with exultation. Such was not the case, however, for orthodox Christian believers in Jesus as “the only begotten Son of the Father.” Hence, their response to the discovery of the scrolls and its implications was less than joyful. Ancient prophets, such as Isaiah, Moses and Zacharia, had predicted the coming of “the Messiah,” “the Holy One of God,” “the Prince of Peace,” etc. And, early Bible authorities were aware that the Essenes had prophesied the coming of a “teacher of righteousness.” It was naturally assumed that this was a term equivalent to those in the scriptures and that Jesus was the fulfillment of the Essene prophecies as well. But the Dead Sea Scrolls revealed that by the time of Jesus, the “teacher of righteousness” had already come and gone. Compounding this is the fact that the Dead Sea Scrolls were a source of further embarrassment to scholars of Biblicism because many of the sayings attributed to Jesus as original are found in the Essene records. Among the expressions and sayings generally claimed by Christians as original with Jesus, but yet contained in the pre-Christian Essene records are:

“Peace on Earth and good will to men,” “You are the salt of the earth; you are the light of the world.” “The thirst for righteousness.” “The kingdom of God.” “The Sons of light and the Children of darkness.”

These are just a few. In addition, I would like to paraphrase from T.N. Tiemeyer’s Jesus Christ Super Psychic. Rev. Tiemeyer states that the Dead Sea apocalyptical scrolls and The Book of Enoch, which were found in the caves of Qumran, beyond a shadow of doubt, have been dated before Christianity. However, these writings contain numerous phrases and concepts similar to those in the Sermon on the Mount. Also a list of selected Essene sayings compared to the Beatitudes of Jesus are remarkably similar. Tiemeyer goes on to say that: “obviously the best explanation is that Jesus was taught in the training schools of the Essenes.” The evidence also points to New Testament persons as disciples of this same cult. The Bible descriptions of John the Baptizer, his life and personal habits conform to the practices of the Qumran community. Again in my mind there is little doubt but that Jesus was an Essene who espoused Essene doctrine which originally came from the teachings of the African Mystery System and were later incorporated as part of the foundation of Christian thought.

MAAT: Now that you have made these astounding revelations concerning the life of Jesus and the origins of his teachings, let us return to our original question: Was this figure of world renown a Black man? And, if so, are there any paintings, statues or icons that portray him as such?

Geoghagen: Indeed, Jesus was a Black man, and there are numerous early paintings, statues and icons that graphically depict both Mary and Jesus as Black people. According to Godfrey Higgins (author of the monumental historical document Anacalypsis), who visited the cathedrals of Europe before the anti-religious period of the French Revolution, all the madonnas and Christ-childs were depicted as black: “In all the Romish countries of Europe, in France, Italy, Germany, etc., the God, Christ, as well as his mother are described in the old pictures to be black. The infant God in the arms of his black mother, his eyes drapery white, is himself perfectly black. If the reader doubts my words, he may go to the cathedral of Moulins – to the famous chapel of the Virgin of Loretto, to the Church of Annunciata; the Church of St. Lazaro, or the Church of St. Stephen at Genoa, to St. Francisco at Pisa; to the Church of Brixer in the Tyrol, and that of Padua; to the Church of St. Theodore at Munich, etc. This is further supported and documented by the work of J.A. Rogers, Albert Churchward, Yosef ben-Jochannan, C.W. King, J.S. Matthews, Gerald Massey and various other writers who give detailed accounts of the original Black Mary and Jesus. It was with the advent of Michaelango, who used his family to pose for the paintings that he did of Jesus, Mary, Joseph, etc. – coupled with European white racism – that we begin to see Jesus portrayed as a white man. But how could it be otherwise? How could a group of people simultaneously proclaim and practice white racism and justify slavery under the guise of bringing the message of Christianity to the ‘heathens’ or ‘pagan black savages’ in Africa – and at the same time tell the truth that Jesus was a Black man and that in fact Christianity started in Africa, where Panteus and Boteus reported that Jesus was born in a cave in Ethiopia? And that it was not until the Nicene conference that Jesus’ birthplace was changed to a stable in Bethlehem.

MAAT: This is the second time you have mentioned the Nicene Conference. Where was this conference held? What was it about? And who attended it?

Geoghagen: There were two councils of the Christian Church held in Nicea (Nice), in what is now northwest Turkey. The most important was called in 325 A.D. by Constantine “the Great” and 219 bishops from all of the powerful Christian regions attended it. It was the intent of Constantine to change Christianity into Christiandom. In other words, religion would now become the vehicle of government control over the people. Achievement of this goal involved changing some of the tenets of Christianity. Anyone who is interested can obtain a copy of the proceedings of the Nicene Conference and see the tremendous political struggle that was going on between the “Men of God.”

One will notice that at least 18 books – including the book of Mary – that were part of the Koin Bible (the original Bible up to that point) were removed from the canons. Furthermore, many of the ancient African teachings, including the concept of reincarnation, were removed from Christianity. And it was at this time that they put into the new Bible the ancient African concept of the Immaculate Conception.

MAAT: Are you literally saying that the original Bible was changed at the Nicene Conference?

Geoghagen: Yes. But this was not the first time that Church leaders had gotten together to fight over what was to be accepted as Christianity. A similar conference was held in Jamnia in A.D. 90, at which time other changes were made.

MAAT: Getting back to the questions of whether Jesus was a Black man: Some scholars, of course, would challenge your position that Jesus was a black man on the ground that he was Jewish and could not therefore have been Black.

Geoghagen: My opinion is that those would be very misinformed scholars because the original Jews were Black people.

MAAT: Some scientists today might also raise the point that the ancient Shroud of Turin, which has been highly touted by the press and which many now claim bears the image of Jesus, does not appear to depict a Black man. What would be your response to this?

Geoghagen: It would be of little consequence as to whether the shroud of Turin appears to be Black, Asian, Caucasian or whatever, because the only thing that scientists are able to determine at this point is that indeed this probably was a shroud that covered a human body and does not appear to be fake.

But no Scientist alive of whom I am aware – racist or nonracist, Christian or non-Christian – can in any way, shape, form or fashion document that the Shroud of Turin is the one that was placed over Jesus’ body at the time of his death.

MAAT: Was Jesus the only great religious leader who was Black?

Geoghagen: Absolutely not. Most of the ancient prophets and saviors of most religions were depicted in their original form as Blacks.

MAAT: If all of these ancient prophets, gods and goddesses were Blacks, does this suggest a universal Black dominance in the ancient world?

Geoghagen: Most certainly, yes. One might read Gerald Massey’s Egypt: The Light of the World, from archaeological and anthropological evidence alone, there is no doubt that the race of Black people was the seed race for humanity. In other words, we were here before anyone else and our presence was felt and known throughout the world.

We not only occupied Africa, but our remains have been discovered from the Fiji Islands to Tasmania, Melanesia, India, China, Japan, Mexico and even Europe. Many scientists have shown that the original race of people in all of these areas was the Black race.

MAAT: Why is it that the facts that you have revealed here are unknown to the general public?

Geoghagen: They are intentionally kept from the public. You take a situation where you have a group of people – namely white people – who have actually taken philosophy, religion, education, science, liberal arts, everything that you can associate with the word “culture” from Black people. They have taken it, distorted it, adopted it and used it against the very people from whom they received it as a justification for slavery. So, it was convenient to enslave Blacks in Africa under the guise of spreading Christianity when it fact the religion as developed in Africa (there were 27 bishops and seven Popes of the North African Church before the first one in Rome – this is documented in the book Libers Pontificals, which, when translated into English, is Book of the Popes). I should also point out here that few references are made to the fact that three of the earliest fathers of the Christian church were Blacks. St. Augustine (born at Tagaste, Numida, North Africa in 354 A.S.), who set the moral doctrine of the Christian Church; Tutillian and Cyprian. How could white people tell Blacks that they had no history or culture other than that which Europeans gave them and at the same time tell them that Christianity was not only developed by Blacks, but that its master, Jesus, was a Black man? This could not be done.

MAAT: Why do you think that it is important for Black people to know that Jesus was a Black man and that Christianity is of African origin?

Geoghagen: I feel that this information is critical to the self- esteem and future of Blacks around the globe. Our contributions as the originators of high culture or “civilization” have been systematically kept from us. Our inventions, our philosophies, our religious concepts and

systems have been stolen, co-opted, distorted, adopted and then used against us. We as a people must begin to assert ourselves and to reclaim our history and our science, and become knowledgeable about who we are, whence we came, and where we are going. Without a thorough knowledge and understanding of African history (including the development of Christianity in Africa), our future as a people is at best bleak. ——————————————————————–

From Legrand H. Clegg II, Editor & Publisher

Posted by John the Revelator

Christianity is the most popular religion in the world, and the center of gravity for the faithful is in Africa.
As The Economist recently reported, Black people are the most devout Christians. Although Europe remains the continent with the largest number of Christians, church attendance in Europe is falling due to “creeping secularism,” an emphasis on individual spirituality over organized religion among younger people, and affluence.
The Economist report makes the point that in richer countries, such as those among Western Europe, citizens attend services less frequently. This makes the U.S., with its 58 percent church attendance among self-identifying Christians, somewhat of an outlier.
“The odds that an individual will attend church are 15 percentage points higher in the world’s 29 most unequal countries than they are in the most equal ones,” The Economist reported. “And people on the lower rungs of their own country’s economic ladder tend to be more observant than those at the top.”
In America, which is a wealthy nation with unusual inequality, African-Americans and Latino immigrants are poorer than the national average, and very devout.
While a mere 9 percent of the 100 million people living in Africa were Christians in 1910, 55 percent of the billion people living in Africa today are Christian, according to the Centre for the Study of Global Christianity at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary. Of five sub-Saharan nations–Ghana, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa and Zimbabwe—90 percent of self-identifying Christians reportedly attend church regularly, meaning there could be as many as 469 million churchgoers in Africa. To put that in perspective, 335 million people who attend church live in Latin America, which is 60 percent more than in Europe, according to The Economist.
It is instructive to examine why the formerly colonized—for our purposes, people of African descent—are the most religious Christians. Why is it that the people who are the most entrenched in poverty and suffering the most, whether Black people in Africa or Black people in America, thump their Bibles the hardest?
Surely, one can understand the role of liberation theology, of social justice Christianity, the notion of Jesus the Black freedom fighter who rights wrongs and helps Black people as they struggle through hard times.
But what happens when the colonization of a people is mental? Missionaries came to Africa to “soften up” the local populations, making them pliable and ready for white supremacy, the exploitation of their land, resources and bodies inherent in colonization. They were given, and gladly clung onto, the least empowering narratives–of God as a white man and a white master, and the notion of blind faith and forgiveness, and enduring suffering in life so that you go to Heaven once you die. But what about having Heaven on Earth? What of the concept of accumulating wealth so as to provide a secure future for one’s children and successive generations? We are not talking about prosperity gospel, which is simply pimping with a collar and cross, but rather a demand for basic human rights, of economic security, dignity, freedom, and justice.

In other words, if our devoutness is related to our continued exploitation and economic subjugation, then what benefits have we derived from our faith, when Christians in the advanced world are not made to sacrifice their wealth for their faith? And that’s wealth they stole from Africans, by the way, with compounded interest.
The key for Black people is to channel their faith—whatever their religion, or lack thereof– in a manner that speaks to their condition, their culture and their values. Certainly, Kwanzaa is an effort to make Black spirituality real, regardless of one’s religion, in promoting strong values, perpetuating institution building, and bringing about positive outcomes in the community.
“I’m saying that you are closer to God the further you get away from organized religions that are all handmaidens of conquest,” Dr. John Henrik Clarke once said. “And these belief systems that had their origins in Africa–all of them, and there is no exception–turned on African people. Everything that was brought into this continent–everything, every idea, every so called religion–was meant to dominate and to control. Every element that was put into the making of every major religion started in Africa. Why is it you are so naïve, you let people redress something you invented, send it back to you and enslave you through it?”

Written by David Love/AtlantaBlackStar

Posted by John the Revelator

In a very candid video appeal on Wednesday, popular Christian rapper Lecrae challenged his “white brothers and sisters” to explain why they never protest when he talks about issues like abortion or the Islamic State terror group, but usually express concern when he speaks out about racial injustice.

“I have historically posted things about abortion, Planned Parenthood, and my thoughts on that. I’ve sat down with leading thinkers and pastors. I’ve done videos, posted those videos. Talked about ISIS and the terror that is ISIS and how it has affected us all, it affected our Christian brothers and sisters throughout the world,” said the rapper in the video posted to his Facebook page.

“In both of those instances I have received encouragement and people saying thank you for speaking about this. We appreciate this, specifically from my white brothers and sisters. But yet, when I’ve spoken out recently about what I see to be authoritative or racial injustice, there is this sentiment of what feels like hostility,” he explained.

“I don’t want to read into people’s comments but it feels like hostility or defensiveness. And many times there’s a response of ‘why don’t you talk about ISIS? Or why don’t you talk about abortion?’ And I’ve never seen on the times when I’ve spoken about persecution or abortion people respond with ‘why don’t you talk about racial injustice?’ And so I’m interested in understanding what the sentiment here is?” he said while warning against antagonistic reactions.

Lecrae’s challenge came after making two earlier posts highlighting the shocking body camera video showing the shooting death of 43-year-old Samuel Dubose by University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing during a traffic stop on July 19 and excerpts from the 2001 book, Divided by Faith: Evangelical Religion and the Problem of Race in America by sociologists Michael O. Emerson and Christian Smith.

Pointing to the excerpt from the book, Lecrae highlighted that “boats need rockin[g].”

Traversing history, we find some common markers. Because evangelicals view their primary task as evangelism and discipleship, they tend to avoid issues that hinder these activities. Thus they are generally not counter-cultural. With some significant exceptions, they avoid ‘rocking the boat,’ and live within the confines of the larger culture. At times they have been able to call for and realize social change, but most typically their influence has been limited to alterations at the margins.

So, despite having the subcultural tools to call for radical changes in race relations, they most consistently call for changes in persons that leave the dominant social structures, institutions, and culture intact. This avoidance of boat rocking unwittingly leads to granting power to larger economic and social forces. It also means that evangelicals’ views to a considerable extent conform to the socioeconomic conditions of their time. Evangelicals usually fail to challenge the system not just out of concern for evangelism, but also because they support the American system and enjoy its fruits. They share the Protestant work ethic, support laissez-faire economics, and sometimes fail to evaluate whether the social system is consistent with their Christianity.

Challenged by the discussion, a number of the rapper’s white fans provided insights he called helpful.

“The white race feels victimized by all this news (not new at all) about racism. It’s rooted in our insecurity and ignorance of what race and culture actually is. Some people would rather talk about issues that don’t involve themselves in any way as a possible culprit. They’d rather point the finger than be vulnerable,” noted Nathan Miller in a response that was liked nearly 2,000 times.

“I think defensiveness is greater on race relations as opposed to abortion and ISIS because of the characters involved. So with ISIS you have evil, unequivocal evil. So there is no defensiveness and people want to talk about that. With abortion, you have innocence (not speaking theologically but of perception), so people want to wade into those waters to protect the innocent. With race relations you have complexity, as there is abuse from both sides,” wrote Eric Dickey.

“There is an element of aggression and intimidation present in the urban black community. It’s undeniable. There is aggression and intimidation and power abuse by police. But many white people can’t see that side of the police, because we see our neighbor, or our uncle, or cousin, or dad. It’s close. So, to delve into this discussion requires caution and gray lines, and people don’t like that. I don’t know. It’s a heartbreaking issue. It’s hard being this divided, and knowing you don’t want to be,” he added in his comment that was liked nearly 1,000 times.

“Lecrae, I am a 54-year-old Caucasian female who loves your music and the way you speak truth. I believe this is a conversation that needs to happen, and I believe that unless people can be honest without being ugly nothing will be accomplished,” noted Tracy Enman Carrasquillo.

From CP

Posted by John the Revelator

Two years ago this question would have been odd to me. I was assured in my answer as well as my belief so I thought. I wrapped myself in a cloak of invisibility, not allowing my scars to show. Yet I maneuvered ready to pounce on anyone who thought differently. Then I came from my mountain high and surrounded with differing opinions, this was most dangerous. I began to arm myself with unfamiliar material from people I hadn’t yet heard of. As I read and studied I became the artist about to paint a masterpiece, I was the blank slate. From there I became a sponge, I absorbed without hesitancy a new way to view the troubling question of God. As I took on this journey it hurt, it caused great pain. Pain is the process to rebuild. It is the process for us to reach the other side of doubt and ignorance.

You may ask, where is your God? I have to say; “YOU!” You are your God. Since you (white invaders) created him. For me to let go still takes me through journeys. My travels take me to a mirror, a mirror that represents truth. It shows a black face, and then I look at Jesus, a white face. I began to look at all the other religions and I notice the faces match the region. The quandary is this Jesus person. Why doesn’t he look or resemble me? This is fair enough question, one that should be constantly asked; but! The most common answer is always the same. What difference does it make? Again two years ago this would have been my answer, today, not so much.

The culture that creates God creates the God in their image. Look at all the other religions, Hinduism, Shintoism, and Daoism; accept for Christianity all of the Gods resemble the culture. This type of brainwashing and dishonesty has the black mind in an influx, even in the darkest part of Africa Jesus is white. To me this is baffling bordering on insanity. Love, love, it’s about love and nothing else. We get misdirected and we lose the point of it all. To go even further, didn’t we have a religion before the invaders, but since it was wrapped and shrouded in dark mysteries without understanding it is thrown away and placed in the category of occultism. Notice who sets the rules, by simply saying that they didn’t say it, but the mythist god of the bible did. If we take a closer look at the word “God,” even it was a created word as recent as the nineteenth century. This word “God” has different meanings; it’s not a cohesive word.

Overall we have to look at this figure whom Paul the self-appointed Apostle created. Before I continue you do realize this is all faith based there is no evidence to prove a belief; belief is a hope, not a fact! Oddly enough Luke and a very good friend of Paul, whom walked talked, drank, prayed, laughed, yet Paul never met Jesus, even in passing. The question arises, did Jesus exist. Why not? I believe him to be a man not a deity that Paul has created for us to believe. We really have no proof of his existence except for some scant references. The best and honest source I’ve found is “The New Testament its background, growth, and content by Bruce M. Metzger,” who also is a believer. Chapter 4 the sources for our knowledge of the life and teaching of Jesus Christ Pages 74-78, not much evidence at all. Jesus is the most important figure in our time, yet he’s a mystery. We know more about his predecessors in the cult religions than we know of him. So what is the black man to believe? Our natural rights were taken. Your rights were given to “us” by a deity; taken. All men were created equal; taken. If we weren’t given the right to read and think, what makes us to believe we were given correct religion? If we need a deity or a creator being, do as the invader and create one, in “our” image.

Lastly I have a major issue with a white Jesus. It’s important that it’s recognized this way. How is it that all creation comes from Africa but the god is white? When Jesus and family had to flee they went to Egypt to blend in. Egypt then was known as ancient Kemet, meaning “the land of the blacks.” If you want to believe in a deity, at least make him black even this separates you from the dominant society and creators of this myth.

It is said that history is written by the victor, that much has been proven to be true. Our history, black history, which much more profound, it begins before slavery and after slavery. We must write and contend for our own history.

I will be soon starting a podcast on this very post, in which I will expound on in detail. It’s one thing to have an opinion; it’s another to have an informed opinion. Stay tuned for more original content. I haven’t post much original content, for I’ve been busy working a new book, which requires a lot of research. As of know, it is entitled “Woman art thou really loosed.” I take a look at how the bible views women, and you wonder why women are so mistreated in ministry. I also want to put “Kicking over sacred cows,” in long form, a teaching format; which should be a lot fun.

Written by John The Revelator

My Jesus Rap

Posted: May 4, 2015 in Religion
Tags: , , , , ,

Let me say first; I strongly dislike Christianity! It is a stumbling block to any rational thinking person, especially to black people(people of the sun). The whole of Christianity was given to the blacks during slavery. Didn’t we have a culture, a religion before the invaders. So much so that the invaders copied our ancient concepts, reinvented them and reinterpreted them. Simply think of the Jesus Myth, it was a copy of the Egyptian myth Osiris. He sacrificed his life to come back as a savior, sounds very familiar doesn’t it. Slavery gave us the image of Jesus. Every religion that has created a god is always in the image of the creators. So when we worship the image we are worshiping what was given, not what was created by the black. In other words we are worshiping “whites”, why do you think the Jews created him to be Jewish or whites within the creation of the first Pope to make him in their image. To be honest, we have no real evidence of this mans life. How is it that we have no way of knowing how he looks, yet we have pictures plastered all over walls. Doesn’t the script speak against graven images. The first time we saw the image of Jesus was the last supper painting by Leonardo de Vinci, which had his uncle posing as Jesus. Slavery was built upon concepts, concepts of deceit. We must forgive the slave master, turn the other cheek, and we will receive our reward in the great bye and bye. From MLK’s memoir, he writes about death threats he was receiving from earnest and fine christian men.”The bible is strong for segregation between the 12 tribes of Israel. We need and will have a Hitler to get our country straightened out.” Unbeknownst to the writer of the letter, Hitler did send minions to spy on meetings held by the KKK, but they thought these people were so ignorant and backwards he couldn’t use them. Even though I disagree with Islam equally, at least the NOI created there god in their image and made the religion black. If mainstream black denominations started saying Jesus was black and proved it through the bible and history of ancient Kemet which is easily proven, they’re would be a war. Many ignorant people believe this already, look at megyn Kelly and her white Jesus comments. Many blacks fall for the trap of “what does it really matter what color he is,” while on the surface that may true; as long as its not questioned that he may well be black. In Matt 2:13 the flight into Egypt, notice his family went to Kemet(land of the blacks) so he could blend in and not be out of place. This is yet but a simple reference.

Religion overall is personal, everyone thinks what they believe is the ultimate truth. That is the problem we have to coexist  and be excepting of others or not. People speak of the U.S. being a nation of laws, sure, but only when it completely fit they’re narrative. It’s time that blacks create their own religion, their own spiritual concepts. Think of it this way, all religions are man made. The creation of Christianity wasn’t by Jesus, it was by men; he never heard of Christianity. Because of fear, most would never fall away from the faith for truth, for fear fire and brimstone. What ever gets you through the day, fine. Live life and live it well.

Written by John the Revelator

how jesus became godWritten in support of the new book How Jesus Became God : The Exaltation of a Jewish Preacher from Galilee.

Jesus was a lower-class preacher from Galilee, who, in good apocalyptic fashion, proclaimed that the end of history as he knew it was going to come to a crashing end, within his own generation. God was soon to intervene in the course of worldly affairs to overthrow the forces of evil and set up a utopian kingdom on earth. And he would be the king.

It didn’t happen. Instead of being involved with the destruction of God’s enemies, Jesus was unceremoniously crushed by them: arrested, tried, humiliated, tortured, and publicly executed.
And yet, remarkably, soon afterwards his followers began to say that — despite all evidence to the contrary — Jesus really was the messiah sent from God. More than that, he was actually a divine being, not a mere human. And not just any divine being. He was the Creator of the universe. After long debates among themselves they decided that he was not secondary to the one God of Israel, the Lord God Almighty himself. On the contrary, he was fully equal with God; he had always existed for eternity with God; he was of the same essence as God; he was a member of the Trinity.

How did that happen? How did we get from a Jewish apocalyptic preacher — who ended up on the wrong side of the law and was crucified for his efforts — to the Creator of all things and All-powerful Lord? How did Jesus become God?

That’s the question I address in my book, and I think it’s an inordinately important one, not just for Christians who personally believe that Jesus really is God, but for all of us, whether believers or non-believers, Christians, Jews, Muslims, Buddhists, agnostics, atheists: all of us who are interested (as well we ought to be) in the history of Western Civilization. It is not hard to make the argument that if Jesus had never been declared God, our form of civilization would have been unalterably and indescribably different.

Here is why. If Jesus had never been pronounced a divine being, his followers would have remained a sect within Judaism, a small group of Jews who thought that Jesus had delivered the correct interpretation of the Jewish law. Gentiles would not have converted to follow Jesus any more than they converted to any other form of Judaism. If the religion had not become predominantly Gentile it would not have seen such a steady and remarkable growth, almost entirely with Gentile converts, over the next three hundred years, when it came to encompass something like five per cent of the Empire. If Christianity were not a large and viable religion by the beginning of the fourth century, the emperor Constantine would almost certainly not have converted to it. If Constantine had not converted, masses of former pagans would not have accepted the faith in his wake. The empire would not have become predominantly Christian. The Christian religion would not have been made the official religion of the state. The Christian church would never have become the dominant religious, cultural, social, political, and economic force of the West. We never would have had the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Reformation, or Modernity as we know it. And most of us would still be pagans.

All these developments hinged on the declaration that Jesus was God. So what happened that transformed the crucified peasant, Jesus, into the Lord who created heaven and earth? The answers are not obvious or straightforward, and my book will contain surprises for believers and non-believers alike.

Many believers – at least very conservative evangelical Christians and others who have not had much contact with biblical scholarship – will be surprised to learn that Jesus did not spend his preaching ministry in Galilee proclaiming that he was the second member of the Trinity. In fact, as I argue in the book, the followers of Jesus had no inkling that he was divine until after his death. What changed their views was the belief, which blind-sided them at first, that Jesus had been raised from the dead. And why did they come to believe that? Here another surprise is in store. It had nothing to do with the discovery of an empty tomb three days after his death. The disciples probably didn’t discover an empty tomb. There probably wasn’t a tomb.

The followers of Jesus came to think he had been raised because some of them (probably not all of them) had visions of him afterwards. Both Christian and non-Christian historians can agree that it was visions of Jesus that made some of Jesus’ followers convinced that he was no longer dead. Christians would say that the disciples had these visions because Jesus really appeared to them. Non-Christians would say that (several of ) the disciples had hallucinations. Hallucinations happen all the time. Especially of deceased loved ones (your grandmother who turns up in your bedroom) and of significant religious figures (the Blessed Virgin Mary, who appears regularly in extraordinarily well-documented events). Jesus was both a lost loved one and an important religious leader. As bereaved, heartbroken, and guilt-ridden followers, the disciples were prime candidates for such visionary experiences.

Once the disciples claimed Jesus was alive again but was (obviously) no longer here with them, they came to think that he had been taken up to heaven (where else could he be?). In ancient Greek, Roman, and Jewish thinking, a person exalted to the heavenly realm was divinized – himself made divine. That’s what the earliest Christians thought about Jesus. After that a set of evolutionary forces took over, in which the followers of Jesus began saying more and more exalted things about him – that he had been made the son of God at his resurrection; no, it was at his baptism; no, it was at his birth; no, it was before he came into the world; no – he had never been made the son of God, he had always been the Son of God; in fact, he had always been God; more than that, he had created the world; and yet more, he was an eternal being equal with God Almighty.

It’s a fascinating set of developments. It is highly important. And it matters not just for those who believe that the followers of Jesus got it right, but for anyone who cares about the factors that shaped the world we live in today.

Written by Bart Ehrman

Posted by John the Revelator

We’re the ones putting those celebrity evangelists in their mansions.

Have you ever thought about starting a new religion or perhaps a hometown franchise of an old one? Perhaps you’re just looking for a career ladder in a religious enterprise that already exists. No? Maybe you should.

Religion is big business. There are lots of options (over 30,000 variants of Christianity alone), and if the scale is right it can pay really, really well. Creflo Dollar, founder of World Changers Church, has an estimated net worth of $27 million. Benny Hinn comes in at $42 million. Squeaky clean tent revival pioneer Billy Graham bankrolled around $25 million. Even Eddie Long who has been plagued by accusations of sex with underage male members of his congregation can count his bankbook in the millions.

You say you don’t have star power? No worries. Millions of ordinary ministers, priests, missionaries, religious hospital administrators and other church employees earn solid middle- or upper-middle-class incomes in the God business. The pay is good, and for most positions it doesn’t matter what race you are or what grade you happened to get in chemistry.

That said, starting or expanding a religious enterprise doesn’t come cheap, even in an established religion that transforms ordinary members into volunteer outreach staff. Christianity spends an estimated $16 billion annually on the kind of marketing-service blend traditionally called “missionary work.”

Missionary work may include disaster relief or education with recruiting in the mix. An earthquake survivor might receive a solar-powered Bible to go with his rice and beans and sutures. A Hindu child might get free schooling, pencils and paper included, along with the message that the gods his parents worship are actually demons. Among people who are less desperate, the offerings can be more nuanced and less expensive. For example, a lonely student might get offered kindness and dinner by someone who is paid to live near campus as a friendship missionary. Sometimes mention of heaven or hell is all the enticement needed, though even then there may be costs associated with print materials and distribution. Soldiers in Iraq gave out Jesus coins and a little cartoon book showing that when an IED killed a Muslim, he or she went to hell, a fate that could be averted by conversion.

The cost of rice, beans, medical supplies, pencils, swag, facilities and salaries can add up. Fortunately, some of religion’s bigger players have gotten creative in recent years. They’ve figured out how to pay for at least part of their growth on the public dime. Having taxpayers cover a portion your costs, even overhead or infrastructure, drives up your margin. It may actually make the difference between a religious enterprise that is a fiscal black hole and one that is lucrative. So, whether you’re thinking about positioning within a small religion or large, one that’s new or one that’s well established, it’s worth taking a look at these ten examples to see if there’s something you can borrow.

1. Fund your religion classes with school vouchers, tuition tax credits or capital grants. If your religion has or can open accredited private schools, public funding prospects are growing rapidly. Thirteen states created or expanded voucher programs in 2013, accelerating a trend from recent years. Vouchers allow parents to divert their children and tax dollars away from public schools and into private institutions, which then have wide religious latitude. Such a school can include classes in which children memorize sacred texts, for example, but also can infuse a religious perspective into classes as diverse as literature, history, and computer science. The opportunities aren’t limited to grade schools. In New Jersey, an Orthodox Jewish yeshiva is slated for $10.6 million in higher education grants to improve its male-only training in “Talmudic scholarship.” Mind you, the ACLU is quibbling.

To maximize your own public funding you may have to get creative. In Arizona any resident can divert a part of his state income tax to your school to fund a specific student. That means you need those students or their parents to get out and do the solicitation for you!

2. Get free facilities for after-school clubs in public facilities. Child Evangelism Fellowship recruits grade-school children in the U.S. and abroad to born-again Christianity. In 2001, they took a case all the way to the Supreme Court and won the right to use public school facilities for their afternoon clubs. They persuaded the justices that they were teaching moral values, rather like the Boy Scouts and other groups that have long had access to public facilities. But parents who have sat in on the clubs assure us that these “values” include very specific dogmas and doctrines—things like heaven, hell and even biblical justification of genocide. Last year CEF operated over 4,000 Good News Clubs in public school facilities.

3. Nudge your doctrines into public school textbooks and discussions. Texas sets textbook standards for the whole country, and if a tenacious group of Texans gets their way, you may be able to move your message directly into public school curriculum. Members of the state’s textbook review panel have recommended adding creationism to biology texts while reducing coverage of the dominant competing theory. You may think that their account of the creation story is mistaken; yours may be different. But in the long run, their long hard work to blur the boundary between science and myth helps the whole religious sector.

To make matter better, allies in the Texas Republican party proposed a platform in 2012 that prohibited schools from teaching critical thinking skills. Others have pushed to require that each high school offer “Bible as literature” electives, confident that devout teachers will know how to use the course material.

4. Support military missionaries on government salaries. Twenty to 30 years ago, evangelical Christians identified the U.S. military as a prime mission field and soldiers as potential missionaries to the world. Hundreds of evangelical and Pentecostal “endorsing” agencies began credentialing chaplains. Today, according to investigative reporter Jeff Sharlet, more than two thirds of U.S. military chaplains come from one of these two traditions. They have successfully redirected female cadets into the more time-honored roles of wife and mother, shaped entertainment and education in military academies, and cultivated a cadre of officers who support their mission. The Military Religious Freedom Foundation has resisted some of their bold attempts to build an army of Christian soldiers, but missionary chaplains continue to serve and shape America’s fighting men and women, all on the public dime. The door for more remains open.

5. Use federal disaster relief to rebuild after “acts of God.” Thanks to lobbying by religious leaders like the Catholic bishops and the Becket Fund, four U.S. senators are promoting legislation that would qualify churches, mosques, temples and synagogues for federal emergency (FEMA) funds if they get damage in natural disasters. The House of Representatives approved a similar measure early in the year. If you own or manage church property, it’s worth keeping your eye on this legislation. Your odds of having real estate damaged by a hurricane or earthquake may be low currently, but extreme weather events, like sea levels, appear to be on the rise. Should the bill pass, you might get to make a claim on a public insurance pool that lets religious entities skip out on the premiums.

6. Leverage historic preservation grants to rehab your real estate. If you’ll be making an investment in religious real estate as a base for operations or to attract members, you might want to do a little digging in the archives. Federal grants may be available for restoration and repairs if your church is deemed historically significant. Like many other aspects of public funding for religion, this boundary has shifted in recent decades. Spending tax dollars on church buildings was ruled illegal in the 1970s but acceptable by 2003.

If you want to sell your historic church later for redevelopment, don’t worry, Jefferson’s wall of separation applies. In Washington State, for example, the Supreme Court ruled that a church could to sell to the highest bidder, even though their iconic building had been designated a landmark and the deal included a likely wrecking ball. Some knives don’t cut both ways.

7. The public underwrites religious infrastructure. Some religious groups may be able to build a portfolio of real estate investments without having to contribute to public amenities, utilities, transportation, or policing. Many community services and assets get paid for by real estate owners through property taxes. But for a long time, houses of worship have been exempt, making them effectively subsidized by surrounding properties. In March 2013, pro-religion Arizona lawmakers proposed to expand that exemption to all properties held by religious entities, as long as they are not producing a profit. Such a change might allow a savvy investor to sit on undeveloped or underdeveloped land without incurring the annual costs faced by other speculators. Tax exempt real estate can offer a way to invest those tithes as membership grows.

8. International aid dollars. World Vision, a multi-national with an evangelical mission and employee statement of faith has built a vast loyal following largely by appending evangelistic priorities to US aid dollars. World Vision offers desperate people the basics: food, clothing, shelter, medical care, and education—with a carefully titrated dose of Biblical Christianity. Their genius lies in the fact that most of their services are funded by Americans at large.

Administrators and lawyers succeeded in persuading governmental granting agencies that World Vision is a non-proselytizing aid organization, while simultaneously persuading the courts they can’t fulfill their mission with heretics among warehouse staff. In 2007, three employees sued because they were fired over their interpretation of Christianity, which was at odds with the required employee statement of faith. World Vision fought all the way to the Supreme court and won. If Harvard Business School should need a case study on how an enterprise can solicit government contracts while circumventing the Civil Rights Act and other cumbersome employment laws, this is it.

9. Administering public health facilities. With Obamacare and technology costs driving hospital mergers, religious healthcare corporations like Catholic Health Initiatives ($15B+ in assets) are finding that they can secure monopoly positions in many communities or even entire regions. This puts them in the power position when it comes to pricing services and negotiating labor contracts, which means mergers pay dividends. The Lund Report, which monitors Oregon’s healthcare system, reports annual profits of $2 billion and counting for the Providence chain.

Like other sectors such as aid and education, healthcare offers an array of opportunities for religious enterprises to expand and improve their brand appeal with little of their own money at risk. Consider this:

“Religious hospitals get 36% of all their revenue from Medicare [and] 12%…from Medicaid. Of the remaining 44% of funding, 31% comes from county appropriations, 30% comes from investments, and only 5% comes from charitable contributions (not necessarily religious). The percentage of church funding for church-run hospitals comes to a grand total of 0.0015 percent.
Administering health services allows a religious entity to restrict the service mix base on their beliefs about what God wants. For example, in Catholic-run facilities, directives from the bishops prohibit contraception and end-of-life options. Faith-related icons and outreach materials can be made available in waiting rooms. Depending on how your organization is structured, you may be able to preferentially hire members of your group and so keep the money in the family so to speak, all the while reaping the good will that comes with community service.

10. Provide safety net services to potential converts. Prisoners, addicts, single moms, pregnant teens, the elderly, foster kids…the possibilities are endless. President George Bush established an Office of Faith Based Initiatives, which worked to strengthen religious organizations in their ability to provide social services. In the first year, 2005, $2.2 billion in grants were awarded to religious organizations. (Barack Obama later revamped and expanded the office, appointing a cadre of religious leaders as advisors and putting his personal spiritual guide, Joshua DuBois, at the helm.)

The savvy expansion-minded religious entrepreneur will notice that people who are the target of safety net services often are the very same people who make prime candidates for conversion. In both cases they fit the bill because the fabric of their lives has frayed and they are in need of help. From a business standpoint such a focus may seem less than ideal, but remember this: poor, desperate people are the ones who put those celebrity evangelists in their mansions.

By VALERIE TARICO, ALTERNET

Posted by John the Revelator

myth and reality word cloud

Since coming out about organized religion, which is man made. I’ve realized while looking at it from the other side. Man was I obnoxious! Yet in my time of reflection I now see things differently. I’m also free, free from holding on to dogma. I find myself studying more than I ever did before. While driving I was thinking what we accept, which is the bases of this writing. If people know the first five books of the bible as well as the rest of the Old Testament to be rubbish and the New Testament to be an fanciful idea; what exactly  are people basing their faith upon! That was the very thing I had to accept personally. When we can become honest with ourselves, we can become honest with the subject of religion. What was I holding onto; fire insurance. If we take a closer look at religion and culture, everyone pretty much believes the same thing, simply explained in a different way. What makes Christianity uniquely different is the myth of Jesus. He’s somewhat of an anomaly, he has no history, that is, no historical history. How is it that a man who’s come to be known all over has no history. He’s probably the most famous person ever. I’m not here at this moment trying to dispel the Jesus Cult. Christianity says “you can’t get to the father but by the son”. Paul did a great job by going to great lengths to create this myth. Simply read the books that are ascribed to him. My only point is, we have to be careful in what we believe. Look at the little imps,   I mean elders with their cropped hair and white short sleeved shirts and black pants with the name tag elder. I’m speaking of the Mormons. They give you their well rehearsed spill and afterwards ask you to pray; think about that for a minute! You get the idea! Any religion can say/do the same thing.  We must become more critical, but most of all; HONEST! Let me leave you with a quote:

“Sometimes people hold a core belief that is very strong. When they are
presented with evidence that works against that belief, the new
evidence cannot be accepted. It would create a feeling that is
extremely uncomfortable, called cognitive dissonance. And because it
is so important to protect the core belief, they will rationalize,
ignore and even deny anything that doesn’t fit in with the core belief.

Frantz Fanon, Black skin, White Mask

Written by John the Revelator

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9780970190000Judaism is the African way of life. Judaism was the religion developed in Africa by African people. It was adopted and adapted in a similar fashion to the Yoruba Orisha worship (Vodoun, Santeria, Lacumi, Condomble, etc) and is still being co-opted and altered by non-Africans today. To speak of an African influence on Judaism is like speaking of an African influence on Orisha Worship. It is not an African influence. It is still African and represents an African way of life.

Along with Cheikh Anta Diop, Alex Darkwah also traces Ancient Egypt to geographical Africa. Darkwah has DNA on his side; whereas, Diop used archaeological artifacts, culture, and documentary text to prove his research. He was still challenged by “Europe” and his findings were labeled “untrue” by the scientific world. Darkwah proves that Africans wrote the Bible even though your personal “King James” Version of the Bible may have pages laced with White Greek characters and distributed throughout the world. I thought that the following excerpts were extremely interesting. A website visitor suggested that I read the Darkwah’s book. Thanks to the website reader who suggested that I limit my research to Sub-Saharan Africa. You’ve started a greater quest to delve deeper into Europe’s concealment of our history and to shed more light on how the global world exists in its current state.

The word Israel itself is an Akan word (Ghana). Darkwah points to the story of Jacob in Genesis 32:24-29, where the angel renames Jacob calling him Asrae or the European version, Israel. Asrae, Darkwah declares, is not the name of a nation, but instead means “the first one who visited.”

According to Darkwah, if you as a Christian question the Bible, you were led by your pastor to believe that you were blaspheming God. Here there is a faith versus reasoning quarrel. Now he has been able to reason into faith. Originally, he just had faith. But, as he learned more, he began to reason himself into faith.

It is almost impossible to understand the significance of many Old Testament events and themes apart from the geographical, cultural, and historical situation that existed during the Old Testament times. First of all, the name “Africa” was given to the Continent by Romans. Africa was also called Kemet, Libya, Ortegia, Corphye, Egypt, Ethiopia and/or Sedan, Olympia, Hesperia, Oceania, and Ta-Merry. The ancient name for Africa was “Akebu-Lan” (mother of mankind) or “Garden of Eden.” This name was used by the Moors, Nubians, Numidians, Khart-Hadddans (Carthaginians), and Ethiopians. Genesis 10:6-20 describes the descendants of Ham as being located in North Africa, Central Africa and in parts of southern Asia. Psalm 105:23 mentions the “Land of Ham” in Egypt, and Psalm 78:51 connect the “tents of Ham” with Egypt. In Genesis 10, Nimrod, son of Cush (whose name means “black”), founded a civilization in Mesopotamia. In Genesis 11, Abraham was from Ur of the Chaldees, a land whose earliest inhabitants included blacks.

Ethiopia and Egypt are mentioned more than any other countries in the Bible. Ethiopia is known in the Bible as Cush. Egypt is known as Mizraim. Mizraim and Cush are two sons of Ham. Mizraim is translated–Egypt and Cush Ethiopia. Many readers of this website have contacted me to argue that Egypt is a land of White people. They write…I know your view is common among African American studies-types, but it doesn’t seem to be borne out by historical record. The pharaohs and their priests were certainly not Black. Here goes faith vs. reasoning again. The Romans didn’t get to Egypt until 300 BC. We are talking 6000 years before that. There weren’t any white people present before the Rome invasion. The original Christianity of Egypt was established by the apostle Mark in AD 42 in Ethiopia (Coptic Church–Coptic Orthodox Christianity). We have been told Christianity came from Rome. Does everything come from Europe? That is what we have led to believe.

LAND OF THE BLACKS–LAND OF THE BIBLE: Ancient Egypt was known indigenously as Kemet (Land of the Blacks). Ancient Egyptians have pinpointed their own ancestral origins to Mount Rwenzori Range in the east African cradle, otherwise known as “Mountains of the Moon.” Some accounts state Egyptian civilization came out of Ethiopia, which as a term was used to designate the land south of Egypt (the Upper Nile Valley), or alternatively used to refer to the entire African continent. Chronologically, Egypt’s southern neighbor Nubia, which had its own distinct civilization, was the Nile Valley predecessor.

Jews believe they are God’s Chosen People because of a theological idea the descendants of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob (known in Biblical times as Israelites, later known as Jews) are the chosen people. It comes from the book of Genesis in which God chooses Abraham and his descendants for a unique covenant. The covenant involved certain obligations on the part of the people and promised certain things on the part of God. European Jews believe this covenant is still in effect today—Jews are still a “chosen people.” It may also answer the question why the Jews have been classified White, even with their kinky-bushy hair, swarthy skin, and broadened noses.

The main points of his book are:

Americans and Europeans assume that the Bible is about them, but the Bible is about my ancient ancestors and me…..Alex Darkwah

Modern-day Jews see the Bible as a record of their history because the King James Bible is centered on the history of Israel.

The Jewish people of Europe and America still carry African Tribal names. They carry the names of their ancestors who were Africans.

Statistically, the Lemba people from Southeast Africa are more Jewish than European Jews. In a particular Lemba Clan known as the Buba Clan, 53 percent of the males carry the unique DNA signature of Jewish priests. Males form the Lemba Tribe carry a higher incidence of the Jewish priestly DNA signature than the European and American Jewish population.

When the police have the fingerprints of a wanted man, they know the man whose prints match. The same thing can be said here.

The early Roman Catholic Church portrayed Jesus and his mother in the original Black images of the Jewish people at that time–The Black Madonna. What African tribe were they from?

The time period of the early Catholic Church is closer to the Jews leaving Africa and going to Europe than the Renaissance Painters who painted Jesus White.

What Europe did not count on was that Africans would still know their past.
Darkwah states that ancient Egypt was geographically in Africa and that so called European experts do not know the Ancient Egyptian story because they are not familiar with African tribal names. They do not have the linguistic and cultural backgrounds to identify Egyptian names and have simply transposed the African names of people and places in Ancient Egyptian history into European languages to make it possible for them to claim expertise. Darkwah traces the ancient past of African tribes from the Middle East through Ancient Egypt to inner Africa. He reveals the African tribe that historians gave the fictitious names the Sumerians, Akkadians, and the African Tribes that were the Ancient Egyptians.

Africans are the indigenous Native Hebrews (Jews). The greatest secret of Africa has never been told, and Christian Europe has been seeking to conceal for the past two thousand years is the African origin of the concepts, doctrines, sacramental practices of religion, and the documents that became the foundations of Christianity in Europe. Did you know that the names of Abraham, Isaac, Esau, and Jacob were all derived from African tribal words and names? Did you know that the earliest “Hebrew” name for God, Adonai, was derived from an African tribal word? Did you know that other name of God, Yahweh, was derived from an African tribal God? … Did you know that the names of the authors of the Old Testament are not “Hebrew” or “Jewish” names, but transposed African tribal names? Christian Europe has never known these because it has never known the African linguistic and cultural side of the biblical story.

The indigenous African tribal name of the most popular Ancient Egyptian king the west was Tutu Ankoma—not Tutankhamun. Not only do we know the indigenous African tribal name of this Ancient Egyptian king, but we also know where the modern dynasty of his ancient dynasty is today. We know in Africa that the Ancient Egyptian king who built the middle pyramid in Giza was called Akufu and not Khufu as the experts have told us. We also know that his two sons completed the procession of pyramids and placed a lion in the front of the procession. These sons were Dade Afre and not Djedefra as the experts transposed this name; and his brother was Ochere Afre and not Chephren as the experts have told us. The modern dynasty of these ancient kings is the Akuapem Dynasty that can be found today in the Eastern Region of Ghana. Conservatives, liberals, and all in between can go to check these people out and verify the royal names among these people.

The book is about the Africans who wrote the Bible as well as Ancient Egypt. It is the untold story of the African tribes that were the Ancient Egyptians. It is the untold story of the people from these African tribes that left Ancient Egypt for it to become the biblical Exodus. It is about the untold story of these people that later went to Europe to become the Jews and Hebrews. It is about untold story of the Africans who actually wrote the documents of the Bible before Afrim (Jewish) scholars translated these documents for the Greeks in Ancient Egypt and claimed that their people in Israel wrote those documents.

We in Africa even know the indigenous African tribal name of the people of the Exodus before they went to Europe to become the Jews and Hebrews. A review of a DNA study of Jewish people African tribes discovered one of the African tribes from which some of the people of the Exodus originated. Check it out in the New York Times of May 9, 1999. What does this prove? It proves the Ancient Egyptian and biblical stories were all Black people’s stories.

The Ancient Egyptians were Black people and their modern descendants are alive and well in Africa. Real evidence of the modern descendants of the Ancient Egyptians in the tribes of Africa and the language and culture these people left behind in Ancient Egypt is the most powerful evidence there is about the Black racial origin of the Ancient Egyptians.

In the 1960’s and 1970’s there were Jewish scholars who were secretly traveling around Africa researching African Tribes to find out from which tribe they belonged. They studied the Akan Religion of the Asante people to find out the similarities between Judaism and Christianity. The word Israel was derived from an African Tribal meaning. Most “Jewish” people still carry their African Tribal names of origin.

The Sinai peninsula is clearly in Africa and is where the Israelites claim to receive their oral and written law. Geologically speaking all of the adjacent Arabian peninsula clear up to Syria is part of the African continent. The Great Rift Valley extends from Mozambique to Syria. The continental drift of tectonics shows the Arabian plate breaking off from the continent and colliding into the Asian plate to create the mountain ranges of Turkey and Armenia (University of Moscow).
POLITICAL PALACE: Original Hebrews Were Black
(Submitted by: R. Mosley)

To Judah, B Real & the rest of my already racially enlightened Brothers & Sisters in this forum…..I just want to warn you that most so-called White Jews with genuine Hebrew bloodlines are not ready to accept neither the fact that their Hebrew origins/bloodlines are Black…. nor the fact that all of Mankind descended from the so-called Negroid Race.

I once had a Jewish online “friend” that was just the sweetest thing this side of Heaven until I hit him with the news that his curly hair & dusky features were genetic indicators of his Negroid decent. He freaked out on me in such an ugly fashion that it reminded me of Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde.

You see the stigma attached to being Black is so unpalatable for some folks that it causes them to spazz. But, according to Jim Crow, Willy Lynch, the government, the Catholic Church, European standards, etc…..despite appearances to the contrary caused by recessive genes…if there is one drop of Black blood in your lineage you are considered Black.

Elaborate caste systems were created by “society” for mulattoes, quadroons, octoroons, (Jews), etc. Which explains why so many people of color are still stuck…”color struck” in their slave mentalities today. Light vs. darker complexions meant certain privileges.

But Negroid Jewish ancestry has been a well-known, documented, & accepted fact among educated Caucasians for centuries. Famed scholars, historians, philosophers, scientists, archaeologists, have been known to refer to Jews as sand niggers, mongrels, & other semi Negroid terms.

Such mentality helped to justify their indentured enslavement/employment and use as tax collectors, accountants, bankers, money lenders, overseers, financial watch dogs, slum landlords, foremen, etc to keep track of money for the conquering elite… which included the Romans, then much later & now… the British.

Which is why Austrian born Hitler had little problem victimizing them as he masterminded the German Revolution known as the Holocaust. The German people were sick of working for slave wages in their own highly industrialized nation under the leadership of Jewish watchdogs while their resources were being commandeered & pocketed by the British. Since they couldn’t reach the Brits, (as usual) they attacked the emissaries (overseers).

Over the centuries, due to the race mixing among the Pharisees & Sadducees with the conquering Romans & Asiatic peoples the bloodlines & semi-Negroid (mongrel/chop suey) appearances of the Hebrews & Arabs evolved to become what we see today.

By polite social standards, Yeshua was considered a Black bastard…a militant rebel… of lowly birth that did not meet the social nor political criteria required to be The Messiah.

I guess that when you have been raised to feel smugly & condescendingly superior to someone not even considered HUE-MAN then find yourself in the same boat it is rather mind blowing. When folks prefer to live in a state of denial, their minds are reprobated & they will not be moved. They will twist your words, intentionally take things out of context, and vilify you in an effort to hold onto their delusions of superiority rather than embrace the Black Man as “brother”…or equal. Cain will continue to destroy Abel until God’s day of reckoning.

When asked by Whites what difference does it make whether Jesus was black or White…I simply smile & reply… If it doesn’t make any difference, why did you make Him white? Can YOU handle the Truth?

From stewartsynopsis.com

Posted by John the Revelator